Importance of Dental Health for Overall Health

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Dental diseases can have devastating effects on an individual’s overall health and are an increasing financial burden to society. Not only are dental conditions painful, but they also negatively affect an individual’s ability to function in work or school settings. Oral disease can also cause psychological problems, reducing a person’s quality of life. Although the global burden of untreated dental caries has remained relatively stable over the last 30 years, the overall burden of oral health conditions is predicted to increase as the population continues to grow and age.

Heart disease

Inflammation is a common denominator in cardiovascular disease and gum disease, but the connection between the two is not always clear. People with moderate-to-severe gum disease have a greater risk for cardiovascular disease, as the C-reactive protein (CRP) level increases in response to whole-body inflammation. Dentists should warn their patients that this relationship between dental health and cardiovascular health should not be ignored. It’s also important to have your dentist evaluate your C-reactive protein levels if one year has passed since the last evaluation.

Diabetes

In addition to impairing one’s ability to speak, chew food, and smile, poor oral health is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses. Furthermore, poor dental health can affect a person’s ability to perform in work and school settings. Additionally, oral disease can result in psychological distress and decreased quality of life. However, research highlighting the connection between oral health and overall health is ongoing.

Preeclampsia

A comprehensive plan should address the importance of oral health for women experiencing preeclampsia, including preventive dental care and treatment. Patients should be given information on the advantages and risks of various treatment options. Dental caries is a form of preeclampsia that is the result of the localized demineralization of the dental hard tissues by acid derived from sugar and food debris. Overall, more than 2.4 billion people in the world are affected by dental caries. Women who are pregnant are particularly susceptible to oral caries because of increased sugar intake during pregnancy, changes in oral factors, and a fear of dental procedures.

Preeclampsia in pregnant women

Although national guidance documents emphasize the importance of dental care in pregnancy, many dentists and other providers are reluctant to provide these services. The reasons for this reluctance vary from provider to provider, but some are likely due to liability concerns and lack of knowledge about pregnancy dental guidelines. If you’re pregnant, you’ll likely want to schedule dental visits for yourself, as well as your child. If you don’t have time to schedule a dental visit, consider scheduling a dental appointment with a dentist.

Gum disease

Studies have shown that gum disease can contribute to the development of some diseases. Periodontal disease, a condition where the tissues around the teeth are damaged, may also lead to pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, people with certain diseases, such as HIV/AIDS or diabetes, may have lower resistance to infections, making gum disease more dangerous. Similarly, some cancers and eating disorders can also lead to deteriorated oral health. Additionally, some immune system disorders, such as Sjogren’s syndrome, can cause dry mouth.

Oral cancer

The mouth is an important window into the body and is often overlooked, but there is a connection between dental health and overall health. Poor oral health can cause gingivitis and periodontitis, which are both serious conditions. Many chronic diseases have an oral component, such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Even worse, poor dental health can cause gingivitis, which can lead to serious complications later on.

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